Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Haiku~~humidity



 humid night, quiet
dreaming of the winter's wood
the curtains are still



Sunday, August 6, 2017

Haiku~~~ Full Blueberry Moon



Full Blueberry Moon
sweet scent of hay, summer heat
Autumn comes too soon



A guest Blogger on a wordy Sunday at Pine Creek

Every now and then, across the past 40 years, we drive to the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania.  And I am glad to be able to share this article with you.   

Pine Creek Gorge, aka the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania!
Pine Creek Gorge, aka the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania!

PA Grand Canyon: A Natural Wonder, Pine Creek Gorge, Tioga County, PA


Today we visit a place that had long been on my bucket list, Pine Creek Gorge, aka the Pennsylvania Grand Canyon. We've driven through the region many times, specifically through the beautiful I-99/US 15 Corridor through Wellsboro and the Williamsport area, but we never made our way over to the PA Grand Canyon. This is one of those places that was always on my radar, but we could never find the time to visit this awesome place. Pine Creek Gorge, aka the PA Grand Canyon, became a tourist draw during the depression era in the 1930s, similar to many other natural tourism draws. The CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) one of the groups formed as part of the New Deal Programs proposed and created by FDR during the Great Depression, built roads and facilities at this natural wonder, as they did across this nation. Much of the infrastructure remains intact, allowing us to enjoy the wonder of this awesome natural landmark.
The PA Grand Canyon moniker dates back to the 1930s, when roads and facilities were added to allow for accessibility to this place. A promoter added the moniker to help boost tourism to the region. While in scope, the Pine Creek Gorge does not compare to the actual Grand Canyon, this is truly one awesome place to see. It averages roughly 1000 feet in depth, and is two miles wide at its largest point. This was and remains an important lumber area for the state, though conservation efforts have thankfully lead towards a thriving second growth forest within the gorge, and surrounding Tioga State Forest. The selective logging appears to be getting done in a sustainable fashion that is leaving the forest intact. You can learn more about the heritage of the lumber industry at the Pennsylvania Lumber Museum in nearby Potter County.

The following article dates back to 1937 from the Beaver County Times, from when the area really began to get noticed as a roadside tourism destination. 

We approached the PA Grand Canyon from the northeast, passing through the beautiful Interstate 99/US 15 Corridor, the 287 corridor, and eventually the Route 6 Corridor, which we ended up continuing on across the state once we left the Canyon. This photo was taken at the Tioga-Hammond Lakes Recreation area, a popular spot for anglers and boaters within a scenic part of the state. The Tioga-Central Scenic Railroad runs through the Hammond Lakes area. 

We started on the East Rim of the Canyon at Leonard Harrison State Park.
Coordinates: 41.696927, -77.452384

This cabin was built by the CCC in the 1930s.

A beautiful pavilion that is home to a visitors center and guest facilities serves as a portal to this stunning overlook on the East Rim of the Canyon.

The Turkey Path goes down to the floor of the Canyon with a scenic hike that passes waterfalls and more through the descent. It picks up on the other side of Pine Creek and up the West Rim of the Canyon to Colton Point State Park

The first glimpse of the canyon!

This was one of those days where the weather was questionable. We were unsure of what to expect. It was perfect! The clouds were low, so we were actually truly in the clouds in the gorge.

A look down to the floor of the gorge.

We were truly in the clouds!


Both rims of the canyon have state park camping available.

Both rims of the canyon have state park camping available.

A little bit of sun peeking through the clouds
Adjacent to the creek bed, you can see the Pine Creek Rail Trail. This trail runs 65 miles from end to end and it allows for a tour through the length of the entire PA Grand Canyon.

One of the greatest treats to sightseeing in the PA Grand Canyon is birdwatching and spotting wildlife. I think we saw only one other visitor on the weekday that we visited. The place was silent. We saw many birds flying around, including this turkey vulture. We also saw turkeys, deer, hawks, and more. 

It is clear why this was named Pine Creek Gorge with how many pines are located throughout this picturesque place. It is also clear why Pine Creek Gorge was given the PA Grand Canyon Moniker. It truly is a spectacular gorge.


A state park campground is within walking distance of this vista, along with picnic and playground facilities. There is also a private campground and motel just down the road from this point, in addition to a privately owned 100 foot lookout tower that was relocated from Valley Forge.

Now we move over to the west rim of the PA Grand Canyon to Colton Point State Park. The coordinates to this awesome lookout point are 41.708951, -77.464435


Now we have ventured over to the West Rim of the PA Grand Canyon. This is the main lookout point from Colton Point State Park. Leonard Harrison State Park is located directly across the gorge.

There must have been about twenty turkey vultures sailing around like kites around the point here. It was really quite a sight to see. 


Brit was having a blast photographing these birds of prey.





Such a beautiful place! The questionable weather forecast made for some dramatic and awesome looking skies!


Such a beautiful place! The questionable weather forecast made for some dramatic and awesome looking skies!
A look north!

Lookout Point on the West Rim Trail. 
Coordinates: 41.699913, -77.463687


A lookout point on the West Rim Trail.

A view of Leonard Harrison State Park from across the gorge.
The skies really started clearing up for a short time at this point. The weather was absolutely perfect.

From this point we meandered through the network of stone roads around the Tioga State Forest. We ran into all kinds of wildlife throughout the ride in this scenic area. We eventually made our way back to Route 6 and ventured through the remote and gorgeous Pennsylvania Wilds region.
If you love natural beauty, the Pennsylvania Grand Canyon is a place that you must visit. This is a place that needs to be on your bucket list of things to check out in Pennsylvania.
Leonard Harrison State Park:

Colton Point at Colton Point State Park. Be sure to use directions to this point so you can accurately maneuver around the canyon. 
Coordinates: 41.708951, -77.464435

Thursday, August 3, 2017

In fact they are our greatest treasures

I found this on Facebook.
And she stole my heart, even though she is no longer among us.   Every time I watch this I wish that I had known her,   It wouldn't be more than interesting to hear her talk about the everyday history she lived thru.  The kind of things you don't read about in books.
v https://www.facebook.com/jimmy.huckaby/videos/10202558011972924/
vJimmy Huckaby
This is for anyone who ever had my late grandmother's chocolate pie. I filmed her making it on her 100th birthday. If you want to make it yourself below is the recipe and Ruby Huckaby will show you how its done.
Recipe
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup flour
3 tbsp. cocoa
1/4 tsp. salt
3 eggs
1 sm. can evaporated milk
1 cup of water
1 tsp. vanilla
1 baked pie shell
Mix sugar, flour, salt and cocoa. Add milk to the dry ingredients.
When moistened, add egg yolks alternately. Add water; mix well,
put in double boiler and cook until thickened. Pour into baked
pie shell. Use egg whites for meringue.Jimmy Huckaby
This is for anyone who ever had my late grandmother's chocolate pie. I filmed her making it on her 100th birthday. If you want to make it yourself below is the recipe and Ruby Huckaby will show you how its done.
Recipe
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup flour
3 tbsp. cocoa
1/4 tsp. salt
3 eggs
1 sm. can evaporated milk
1 cup of water
1 tsp. vanilla
1 baked pie shell
Mix sugar, flour, salt and cocoa. Add milk to the dry ingredients.
When moistened, add egg yolks alternately. Add water; mix well,
put in double boiler and cook until thickened. Pour into baked
pie shell. Use egg whites for meringue.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

haiku



watching the shadows
advance and retreat, sun warms
my bones, rest is sweet

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Really wordy Sunday with a guest blogger~~~clouds

v

vMartin Deja/Moment/Getty Images
Martin Deja/Moment/Getty Images

6 Must-Know Facts About Clouds


Clouds are a common sight, but have you ever thought to ask these basic questions about them?

1. What are clouds?

Clouds are visible collections of tiny water droplets (or ice crystals if it's cold enough) that live high in the atmosphere above the Earth's surface.

2. How do clouds form?

Clouds form when a parcel of air rises from the surface up into the atmosphere. As the parcel ascends, it passes through lower and lower pressure levels (pressure decreases with height).
Recall that air tends to move from higher to lower pressure areas, so as the parcel travels into lower pressure areas, the air inside of it pushes outward, causing it to expand. This expansion uses heat energy, and therefore cools the air parcel. The farther upward it travels, the more it cools. When its temperature cools to that of its dew point temperature, the water vapor inside of the parcel condenses into droplets of liquid water. These droplets then collect on the surfaces of dust, pollen, smoke, dirt, and sea salt particles called nuclei. (These nuclei are hygroscopic, meaning they attract water molecules.) It is at this point--when water vapor condenses and settles onto condensation nuclei--that clouds form and become visible.

3. Why do clouds billow and change their shape?

Have you ever watched a cloud long enough to see it expanding outward, or looked away for a moment only to find that when you look back its shape has changed?
If so, you'll be glad to know it isn't your imagination. Clouds are ever-changing thanks to the processes of condensation and evaporation.
After a cloud forms, the process that grows it (condensation) doesn't stop. This is why we sometimes notice clouds expanding into neighboring sky. But as currents of warm, moist air continue to rise and feed condensation, drier air from the surrounding environment eventually infiltrates the buoyant column of air, a process called entrainment.
When this drier air is introduced into the cloud body, it evaporates the cloud's droplets and causes parts of the cloud to dissipate.

4. Why do clouds float?

Clouds start out high up in the atmosphere because that's where they're created, but the reason why they remain suspended there has to do with the tiny particles they contain.
A cloud's water droplets or ice crystals are very small, less than a micron (that's less than one-millionth of a meter). Because of this, they respond very slowly to gravity. To help visualize this concept, consider a rock and a feather; gravity affects each, however the rock falls quickly whereas the feather gradually drifts to the ground because of its light weight. Now compare a feather and an individual cloud droplet particle; the particle will take even longer than the feather to fall, and because of the particle's tiny size, the slightest movement of air will keep it aloft. Because this applies to each cloud droplet, it applies to the entire cloud itself.
(More: How much does a cloud weigh?)

5. How do clouds move?

Clouds travel with the upper-level winds. They move at the same speed and in the same direction as the prevailing wind at the cloud's level (low, middle, or high).
High-level clouds are among the fastest moving because they form near the top of the troposphere and are pushed by the jet stream.

6. How do clouds get their color?

A cloud's color is determined by the light it receives from the Sun. (Recall that the Sun emits white light; that white light is made up of all the colors in the visible spectrum: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet; and that each color in the visible spectrum represents an electromagnetic wave of a different length.)
The process works like this: As the Sun's light waves pass through the atmosphere and clouds, they meet the individual water droplets that make up a cloud. Because the water droplets have a similar size as the wavelength of sunlight, the droplets scatter the Sun's light in a type of scattering known as Mie scattering in which all wavelengths of light are scattered.
Because all wavelengths are scattered, and together all colors in the spectrum make up white light, we see white clouds.
In the case of thicker clouds, such as stratus, sunlight passes through but is blocked. This gives the cloud a grayish appearance.
Martin Deja/Moment/Getty Images








Haiku~~humidity

 humid night, quiet dreaming of the winter's wood the curtains are still